Live Bliksemontladingen

De teller in het icoon met het onweersbuitje geeft live het actuele aantal bliksemontladingen uit onze regio weer. De dekking ligt in een vierkant om Nederland en België, waardoor er ook data van rondom Parijs, op de Noordzee en uit een deel van Duitsland wordt weergegeven.

Ontladingen

De ontladingen kun je terugvinden op de Google Maps kaart onderaan de pagina. Deze worden nog niet live bijgewerkt, voor de meest actuele ontladingen ververs je de pagina. De iconen op de kaart lopen in kleur van Geel naar Rood, waarbij Geel een 'nieuwe' ontlading is en Rood een 'oude'.

Geluid

De teller maakt geluid als het aantal bliksemontladingen verhoogt. Dus, bij een update van 0 naar 1 hoor je geluid. Je kunt dit uitschakelen met het luidspreker icoontje in de balk hierboven.

Data © Blitzortung.org / Lightningmaps.org
nl
StormTrack Beta
Inloggen
Heb je nog geen account? Dan kun je er hier eentje aanmaken!
De Bilt

Geen onweer in de buurt
Nu Live

De kaart Schiphol - Sneeuwval
KNMI Expertpluim
is bijgewerkt.

20 Apr 2019 05:00:01

De kaart Schiphol - Neerslag
KNMI Expertpluim
is bijgewerkt.

20 Apr 2019 05:00:01

De kaart Schiphol - Temperatuur
KNMI Expertpluim
is bijgewerkt.

20 Apr 2019 05:00:01

De kaart Maastricht - Dauwpunt
KNMI Expertpluim
is bijgewerkt.

20 Apr 2019 05:00:01

De kaart Maastricht - CAPE/Onweer
KNMI Expertpluim
is bijgewerkt.

20 Apr 2019 05:00:01

De kaart Maastricht - Windstoten
KNMI Expertpluim
is bijgewerkt.

20 Apr 2019 05:00:01

De kaart Maastricht - Sneeuwval
KNMI Expertpluim
is bijgewerkt.

20 Apr 2019 05:00:01

De kaart Maastricht - Neerslag
KNMI Expertpluim
is bijgewerkt.

20 Apr 2019 05:00:01

De kaart Maastricht - Temperatuur
KNMI Expertpluim
is bijgewerkt.

20 Apr 2019 05:00:01

De kaart Leeuwarden - Dauwpunt
KNMI Expertpluim
is bijgewerkt.

20 Apr 2019 05:00:01

De kaart Leeuwarden - CAPE/Onweer
KNMI Expertpluim
is bijgewerkt.

20 Apr 2019 05:00:00

De kaart Leeuwarden - Windstoten
KNMI Expertpluim
is bijgewerkt.

20 Apr 2019 05:00:00

De kaart Leeuwarden - Sneeuwval
KNMI Expertpluim
is bijgewerkt.

20 Apr 2019 05:00:00

De kaart Leeuwarden - Neerslag
KNMI Expertpluim
is bijgewerkt.

20 Apr 2019 05:00:00

De kaart Den Helder - Neerslag
KNMI Expertpluim
is bijgewerkt.

20 Apr 2019 00:59:36
Actueel
1 / 4

Lentediscussietopic 2019

Zonnig paasweekend

Het Lente Waarnemingentopic

Natuurbranden in de Benelux

Risico neemt toe

Droogteseizoen van start

×
Kies een plaats
Beschikbare Plaatsen:
×
Welke meldingen wil je ontvangen?

Je kunt hieronder aangeven welke notificaties je wil ontvangen in 'Nu Live'. Standaard ontvang je alle notificaties, wil je een bepaald type melding niet langer ontvangen? Vink dan het vinkje uit. Je keuze wordt automatisch opgeslagen.

×
Nu Live
Welkom op onweer-online.nl! Als je je nog niet hebt geregistreerd, meld je dan nu aan op de leukste en grootste weercommunity van Nederland. Heb je al een account, log dan hier in.
Joyce.s
Moderator
Woonplaats: Helmond
Berichten: 2773
Lid sinds: 13 jan. 2015
27 juni 2015, 08:19 uur | Bericht #457468

NASA Explains Why June 30 Will Get Extra Second



The day will officially be a bit longer than usual on Tuesday, June 30, 2015, because an extra second, or “leap” second, will be added.

“Earth’s rotation is gradually slowing down a bit, so leap seconds are a way to account for that,” said Daniel MacMillan of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

Strictly speaking, a day lasts 86,400 seconds. That is the case, according to the time standard that people use in their daily lives – Coordinated Universal Time, or UTC. UTC is “atomic time” – the duration of one second is based on extremely predictable electromagnetic transitions in atoms of cesium. These transitions are so reliable that the cesium clock is accurate to one second in 1,400,000 years.

However, the mean solar day – the average length of a day, based on how long it takes Earth to rotate – is about 86,400.002 seconds long. That’s because Earth’s rotation is gradually slowing down a bit, due to a kind of braking force caused by the gravitational tug of war between Earth, the moon and the sun. Scientists estimate that the mean solar day hasn’t been 86,400 seconds long since the year 1820 or so.

This difference of 2 milliseconds, or two thousandths of a second – far less than the blink of an eye – hardly seems noticeable at first. But if this small discrepancy were repeated every day for an entire year, it would add up to almost a second. In reality, that’s not quite what happens. Although Earth’s rotation is slowing down on average, the length of each individual day varies in an unpredictable way.

The length of day is influenced by many factors, mainly the atmosphere over periods less than a year. Our seasonal and daily weather variations can affect the length of day by a few milliseconds over a year. Other contributors to this variation include dynamics of the Earth’s inner core (over long time periods), variations in the atmosphere and oceans, groundwater, and ice storage (over time periods of months to decades), and oceanic and atmospheric tides. Atmospheric variations due to El Niño can cause Earth’s rotation to slow down, increasing the length of day by as much as 1 millisecond, or a thousandth of a second.

Scientists monitor how long it takes Earth to complete a full rotation using an extremely precise technique called Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI). These measurements are conducted by a worldwide network of stations, with Goddard providing essential coordination of VLBI, as well as analyzing and archiving the data collected.

The time standard called Universal Time 1, or UT1, is based on VLBI measurements of Earth’s rotation. UT1 isn’t as uniform as the cesium clock, so UT1 and UTC tend to drift apart. Leap seconds are added, when needed, to keep the two time standards within 0.9 seconds of each other. The decision to add leap seconds is made by a unit within the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service.

Typically, a leap second is inserted either on June 30 or December 31. Normally, the clock would move from 23:59:59 to 00:00:00 the next day. But with the leap second on June 30, UTC will move from 23:59:59 to 23:59:60, and then to 00:00:00 on July 1. In practice, many systems are instead turned off for one second.

Previous leap seconds have created challenges for some computer systems and generated some calls to abandon them altogether. One reason is that the need to add a leap second cannot be anticipated far in advance.

“In the short term, leap seconds are not as predictable as everyone would like,” said Chopo Ma, a geophysicist at Goddard and a member of the directing board of the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service. “The modeling of the Earth predicts that more and more leap seconds will be called for in the long-term, but we can’t say that one will be needed every year.”

From 1972, when leap seconds were first implemented, through 1999, leap seconds were added at a rate averaging close to one per year. Since then, leap seconds have become less frequent. This June’s leap second will be only the fourth to be added since 2000. (Before 1972, adjustments were made in a different way.)

Scientists don’t know exactly why fewer leap seconds have been needed lately. Sometimes, sudden geological events, such as earthquakes and volcanic eruptions, can affect Earth’s rotation in the short-term, but the big picture is more complex.

VLBI tracks these short- and long-term variations by using global networks of stations to observe astronomical objects called quasars. The quasars serve as reference points that are essentially motionless because they are located billions of light years from Earth. Because the observing stations are spread out across the globe, the signal from a quasar will take longer to reach some stations than others. Scientists can use the small differences in arrival time to determine detailed information about the exact positions of the observing stations, Earth’s rotation rate, and our planet’s orientation in space.

Current VLBI measurements are accurate to at least 3 microseconds, or 3 millionths of a second. A new system is being developed by NASA’s Space Geodesy Project in coordination with international partners. Through advances in hardware, the participation of more stations, and a different distribution of stations around the globe, future VLBI UT1 measurements are expected to have a precision better than 0.5 microseconds, or 0.5 millionths of a second.

“The next-generation system is designed to meet the needs of the most demanding scientific applications now and in the near future,” says Goddard’s Stephen Merkowitz, the Space Geodesy Project manager.

NASA manages many activities of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry including day-to-day and long-term operations, coordination and performance of the global network of VLBI antennas, and coordination of data analysis.  NASA also directly supports the operation of six global VLBI stations.

Proposals have been made to abolish the leap second. No decision about this is expected until late 2015 at the earliest, by the International Telecommunication Union, a specialized agency of the United Nations that addresses issues in information and communication technologies.
Bron: http://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/nasa-explains-why-june-30-will-get-extra-second
Joyce.s
Moderator
Woonplaats: Helmond
Berichten: 2773
Lid sinds: 13 jan. 2015
27 juni 2015, 13:57 uur | Bericht #457486

'Laatste woord niet gezegd over schrikkelseconde



Moet de schrikkelseconde blijven bestaan, of kan die beter worden afgeschaft?Over die vraag loopt al lang een discussie en het laatste woord is er nog niet over gezegd, vertelt Erik Dierikx van meetinstituut VSL in Delft.

Voorstanders zeggen dat zonder de schrikkelseconde de tijd ''uit de pas gaat lopen'' met de rotatie van de aarde. Tegenstanders zien vooral nadelen in de vorm van storingen in computersystemen.

Op 30 juni wordt weer een schrikkeltel bijgerekend, waardoor het jaar een seconde langer duurt. De klok gaat dan van 23:59:59 eerst naar 23:59:60 voordat middernacht (00:00:00) wordt bereikt.

Doordat de aarde soms langzamer en dan weer sneller om haar as draait, ontstaan er (minieme) verschillen in de lengtes van de dagen. Daardoor moeten eens in de zoveel tijd de atoomklokken - die als referentie dienen voor alle tijden op aarde - worden bijgesteld. De schrikkelseconde is in 1972 voor het eerst toegepast.

Vergadering

In november is er weer een grote vergadering over de toekomst van de extra seconde, op initiatief van de Internationale Telecommunicatie Unie. ''Er liggen geloof ik wel vijf verschillende alternatieven op tafel voor de schrikkelseconde'', aldus Dierikx.

Hij legt uit dat sommige computersystemen tijd gebruiken om te controleren of een boodschap die van de ene naar de andere computer wordt gestuurd, ongestoord kan 'reizen'. ''Als de computer ineens een extra seconde ziet en alarm slaat, kunnen systemen helemaal plat gaan.''
Door: ANP

Bron:http://www.nu.nl/wetenschap/4076777/laatste-woord-niet-gezegd-schrikkelseconde.html
  | Gewijzigd: 1 februari 2017, 13:26 uur, door Joyce.s
Waarom deze advertentie?
Joyce.s
Moderator
Woonplaats: Helmond
Berichten: 2773
Lid sinds: 13 jan. 2015
1 juli 2015, 14:54 uur | Bericht #457791

Duizenden mensen zien schrikkelseconde in Tokio


Het laatste uur van dinsdag duurde niet zestig minuten, zoals gebruikelijk, maar zestig minuten en een seconde. In Tokio keken er dinsdag duizenden mensen naar.De seconde wordt toegevoegd om het verschil tussen de gemiddelde zonnedag en de uurwerkdag (24 uur) te corrigeren. 

Zo blijft de door mensen met elkaar afgesproken tijd gelijk lopen met de 'natuurlijke', astronomische tijd. Die wordt bepaald door de ietwat onregelmatige omloopsnelheid van de aarde.

Om 23.59:59 uur ging de klok eerst naar 23.59:60 voordat middernacht (00.00:00) werd bereikt. Zo wordt bereikt dat de zon in Greenwich op het hoogste punt blijft staan, als het 12.00 uur GMT is. 

Video: Schrikkelseconde in Tokio 

Omstreden

De schrikkelseconde is omstreden, omdat de kans bestaat op verstoring van computersystemen.

Deze regel is in 1972 ingevoerd en is in totaal al 25 keer toegepast.
Door: NU.nl
Bron:http://www.nu.nl/wetenschap/4079263/duizenden-mensen-zien-schrikkelseconde-in-tokio.html
 
Terug naar boven
1 Gebruiker leest nu dit topic, onderverdeeld in 1 gast en 0 leden
Berichten
Er zijn in totaal 26.371 topics, welke bij elkaar 440.331 reacties hebben gekregen.
Leden
We zijn met 10.821 leden.
Het nieuwste lid is AbsoluteDigitizing.

Berichten
Je moet inloggen om je berichten te kunnen lezen.
Dit topic
1 mensen bekijken nu dit topic.

Record
Op 6 december 2010 om 11.29 uur waren er 2.792 mensen tegelijkertijd online op onweer-online!
Stats
Er zijn nu 492 mensen aan het browsen op het forum. 5 Daarvan zijn ingelogd.
Van die 492, lezen 9 mensen het topic "Winter 2011 discussietopic deel 5".

Sponsors en partners

Actueel op OnweerOnline.nl

Het Lente Waarnemingentopic

Droogteseizoen van start

Natuurbranden in de Benelux

Risico neemt toe

Lentediscussietopic 2019

Zonnig paasweekend

© 2003 - 2019 onweer-online.nl   |   Alle rechten voorbehouden   |   Algemene gebruiksvoorwaarden